Saturday, 14 February 2015

Diamond studded Jaipur sword - another Indian treasure added to the British Royal collections.

The British public and people  world over are aware of the wonderful  and  most spectacular treasures from the British Royal Collections which rarely go on display for public view except museums. During the extravaganza  to mark the Queen's Diamond Jubilee, a new exhibition that was part of the Summer Opening of the Buckingham Palace was held on June 24, June 24, 2012 - exploring  how the highly valuable gems had been used and worn by monarchs and Kings - both European and Indian over the last two centuries and their crass display of immense wealth in a world where more than two thirds of people suffer from pangs of hunger, poverty and malnutrition.The visitors to the exhibition were more overwhelmed by the dazzling array of vast array of eye-blinding expensive, stone-mounted jewelery than by their own awe. Such highly crafted Indian Kings' jewelery is a reflection of their opulence and rich royal ambiance in the by-gone era.
Jaipur Maharaja Sawai Sir Madho Singh Bahadur (1861–1922).www.pinterest.com
 The spot light at the exhibition was on the dazzling, resplendent Jaipur Sword and Scabbard studded with magnificent 2,000 carat diamonds with the largest stones thought to be the pale yellow diamonds in the end of the cross guard, one of which is estimated at 36 carats. The Maharajah of Jaipur,
Jaipur Sword and Scabbard studded with magnificent 2,000 carat. www.telegraph.co.uk
Jaipur Sword studded with magnificent 2,000 carat diamonds.sword-site.forums.net
Sawai Sir Madho Singh Bahadur (1861–1922) to mark the king's coronation in 1902 presented this artistic sword to King Edward VII. Made from steel and gold, enamelled in blue, green and red, the diamonds are set in a design of lotus flowers and leaves. The sword contained  719 white and yellow diamonds. Many stones have flat cut with their silverbacked settings, a characteristic  mark of Indian jewellery, mainly native to India.
 

The sword hilt and the scabbard are made of gold, enamelled in blue, green and red and set withrose-cut, brilliant-cut and Indian lasque stones (flat, unfaceted diamonds), which vary in colour from white to yellow and are set in a splendid design of lotus flowers and leaves. The rose and brilliant-cut stones  reveal that they went through the difficult  cutting process in Europe and  the existence of  centuries-old trade in diamonds between India and Europe.

Jaipur Sword and Scabbard studded with magnificent 2,000 carat diamonds stole the show and the British public made a beeline to the venue to have a glance at the historical costly  jewellery collections from the Royal Household.

Ref:

http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/exhibitions/diamonds-a-jubilee-celebration/jaipur-sword-and-scabbard